Tags: Osteoporosis | osteoporosis | men

Men Should Be Tested for Osteoporosis, Too: Study

By    |   Friday, 15 May 2015 12:10 PM

Osteoporosis strikes more women than men, but the consequences of the bone-thinning disease are worse in men, according to new research by the North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System.

The findings, presented at a meeting of the American Geriatrics Society this week, underscored the need for men – as well as women – to be tested for the potentially life-threatening disease.

For the study, researchers surveyed 146 older adults in New York and Florida and found stunning gender differences in perspectives, beliefs, and behaviors surrounding osteoporosis. Among them: Men are more likely to suffer serious consequences, including death, from the condition.

The results showed that while most women would accept osteoporosis screening if offered, fewer than 25 percent of men would, the survey found. Women were also more than four times as likely as men to take preventive measures against osteoporosis, such as taking calcium and vitamin D supplements to strengthen bones.

"We were surprised at how big a difference we found between men and women regarding osteoporosis," said Lead researcher Irina Dashkova, M.D.

"The fact that longevity is increasing in our population is wonderful. But we know from research that when men suffer fractures, their mortality is higher than in women, and that severe medical consequences and loss of independence are much more prevalent in men. In our environment, you just get this perception that osteoporosis is a women's problem. This has to be changed, and the sooner the better."

Osteoporosis strikes about 10 million Americans, most of them women. But the disease also strikes up to 2 million American men. Another 8-13 million men in the United States have low bone mineral density, a condition known as osteopenia that's a precursor to osteoporosis.

Both conditions raise the risk for serious bone fractures, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation. Prior research showed that 13 percent of white men in the United States over age 50 will experience at least one osteoporosis-related fracture during their lifetime.


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Osteoporosis primarily strikes women, but the consequences of the bone-thinning disease are worse in men, according to new research by the North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System.
osteoporosis, men
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2015-10-15
Friday, 15 May 2015 12:10 PM
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