Tags: Health Topics | Heart Disease | High Blood Pressure | medicine | drugs | exercise | medication

These Drugs Can Cause Serious Problems If You Exercise

an ederly woman holds yellow and white statin pills in her right palm
(Peter Byrne/AP)

By    |   Wednesday, 12 June 2019 12:05 PM

If you are taking medication and also exercising beware of the combination – it can be dangerous, a leading doctor tells Newsmax. Approximately 70% of North Americans take prescription medication and need to know what to watch out for when they exercise.

"Even some over-the-counter medications can have potentially dangerous side effects when you engage in vigorous physical activity," says Dr. Gabe Mirkin, a leading sports medicine physician and author of "The Healthy Heart Miracle."

"Have a conversation with your physician and your pharmacist about your active lifestyle and ask them for recommendations. If you exercise in a group, let your companions know what health issues you have. Do not exercise alone if you take drugs that can increase your risk of bleeding or shock in case you have an accident. You should also wear a medic-alert bracelet that can help medics treat you in case of an emergency."

Approximately 27 percent of us take statin drugs to lower cholesterol, 18 percent take drugs to lower blood sugar levels, and another 43 percent use drugs to lower blood pressure such as beta blockers, ACE inhibitors or diuretics. Over half the population also takes aspirin. All of these can be problematic when combined with exercise.

Here is what you need to know about how drugs mix with exercise:

  • Statins. This class of drugs can cause muscle pain and might raise blood sugar levels, increasing your risk of diabetes. "If this is a problem for you discuss it with your doctor who may want to adjust your medication. Sometimes you are better off stopping the statins and continuing your exercise program," Mirkin said.

  • Beta blockers. These drugs used for high blood pressure and irregular heartbeat can reduce your heart rate to a level that makes you tire easily when you exercise. They also can also raise blood sugar levels. Avid exercisers may ask their doctor to switch to another drug that does not slow the heart rate as much.

  • ACE inhibitors. Because they lower high blood pressure by blocking a protein that causes muscles around the arteries to constrict, if you have an accident and lose a lot of blood, the muscles around the heart might not be able to contract effectively dropping your blood pressure dangerously low and sending you into shock, Mirkin said. "ACE inhibitors also increase the risk for dizziness during and after exercising," he adds.

  • Diuretics. These drugs work by increasing urination, thus lowering blood volume. Therefore, you might tire more easily during exercise and increase your risk of heat stroke.

  • Medications that lower blood sugar. If the drugs cause blood sugar levels to drop too low, you might become dizzy and even pass out. That is because 98 percent of the energy for your brain comes from circulating blood sugar. "Those suffering from diabetes should always carry a sugar source with them when they exercise," Mirkin said.

  • Aspirin. This, and other anticlotting medicines can be dangerous if you fall. For example, if you hit your head, you can bleed into your brain which can be fatal.

"By all means, keep on exercising," Mirkin said. "But be careful. Your body will thank you and you may even be able to get off medication if you keep active and make other lifestyle changes."

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If you are taking medication and also exercising beware of the combination – it can be dangerous, a leading doctor tells Newsmax. Approximately 70% of North Americans take prescription medication and need to know what to watch out for when they exercise.
medicine, drugs, exercise, medication, prescription
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2019-05-12
Wednesday, 12 June 2019 12:05 PM
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