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How to Get the Right Amount of Magnesium and Improve Your Health

How to Get the Right Amount of Magnesium and Improve Your Health
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By    |   Monday, 18 November 2019 10:57 AM

There’s ample proof that magnesium is one of the essential minerals for good health. In fact, it is the seventh most popular supplement, says ConsumerLab.com, a company that independently tests to identify the best quality health and nutritional products on the market.

Magnesium’s benefits are many, from maintaining a healthy metabolism to stabilizing the nervous system. It’s also an effective aid for treating migraines, menstrual pain and constipation.

Experts say that this important mineral assists over 300 biochemical functions in the body. Unfortunately, around 80 percent of Americans may have a magnesium deficiency and don’t even know it. A study published in BMC Bioinformatics found that our bodies have over 3,751 binding sites for magnesium which indicates that its benefits are far greater than previously imagined.

While ideally we can get adequate amounts of magnesium from food, conditions such as alcohol abuse, diabetes, diseases of the digestive tract and some medications such as Nexium and Prilosec can cause depletion says Dr. Tod Cooperman, M.D., founder of ConsumerLab.com

“Inadequate intake can also modestly elevate blood pressure and increase the risk of osteoporosis and fractures,” he tells Newsmax. “Magnesium has been shown to have cardiovascular benefits and improve glucose status in people with prediabetes.”

A recent study found that taking magnesium laxatives is associated with a reduced risk of dementia. The study of over 1,000 men and women in Taiwan age 50 and older found that those who were prescribed magnesium oxide for constipation were a whopping 48 % less likely to develop dementia over a 10 year follow-up period than those who had not taken magnesium oxide.

This coincides with a large scale study conducted in the Netherlands that found people with lower levels of magnesium were more likely to develop dementia and Alzheimer’s than those with mid-range to high levels.

Cooperman says that if you aren’t getting at least 300 to 400 milligrams of magnesium daily, consider taking a supplement which will get you to that level.  The best food sources of magnesium are green leafy vegetables, almonds, black beans, avocados and dark chocolate, so if you aren’t loading up on these foods, you may need supplementation.

But finding the right magnesium supplement can be confusing. Do you take magnesium oxide, or chloride, or citrate? There are literally dozens of formulations which is why ConsumerLab.com compiled a comprehensive review on their Web site to demystify the process. The Magnesium Review Supplement analyzed 17 products to find the best buys for the buck. Bone health supplement formulas that include magnesium are also being tested and will soon be added to the review.

“We found that that the best form for most people is magnesium citrate because it is among the best absorbed,” says Cooperman. “You can get one of our top picks, which was Vitacost Magnesium Citrate, for as little as 6 cents a pill which provides 200 mg. of magnesium per tablet.”

Although supplements made with magnesium oxide are a bit less expensive than those made with magnesium citrate, magnesium oxide is not absorbed as well as the citrate version.

Cooperman warns that citrate-containing supplements can, however, increase aluminum absorption from other medications and food. Since aluminum can be harmful to the body and you have questionable kidney function or take aluminum-based medications like Maalox, it would be best to skip the citrate.

He adds that those who need more than 350 mg. of magnesium should consider the chloride version as it is less likely to cause diarrhea than either magnesium oxide or citrate, although it is more expensive. CL’s top picks in this category was Nitricology Magnesium Chloride Liquid which provides 200 mg. of magnesium for about 30 cents.

“This is also a good option for people who have trouble swallowing pills or who prefer a liquid,” says Cooperman.

The doctor also warns that there are many supplements that combine both magnesium and calcium.

“You are probably better off taking magnesium by itself because these two minerals in combination may compete for absorption if taken together in high doses,” he explains.

He points out that both magnesium and calcium supplements can interfere with the absorption of so-called “micro-minerals” such as zinc, chromium and copper. As a result, it is probably best to take these micro-minerals at a different time of day.

“Magnesium can also interfere with the absorption of medications such as certain statins or antibiotics so don’t take them within two hours of having taken your magnesium supplement,” he says.

For a complete listing of the magnesium supplements tested by ConmerLab.com, visit their Web site. The Magnesium Supplement Review is a comprehensive review of the benefits and risks as well as other best buys for this important mineral.

© 2019 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.

   
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There's ample proof that magnesium is one of the essential minerals for good health. In fact, it is the seventh most popular supplement, says ConsumerLab.com, a company that independently tests to identify the best quality health and nutritional products on the...
magnesium, supplement, health
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2019-57-18
Monday, 18 November 2019 10:57 AM
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