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Listening to Music Helps Amp Up Exercise

Listening to Music Helps Amp Up Exercise

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By    |   Thursday, 20 October 2016 12:04 PM


People who engage in moderate exercise but want to amp up their exercise routines to high-intensity interval training (HITT), may want to add headphones to their routines.


Research recently published in the Journal of Sport Sciences found that listening to music appears to make it easier for first-time HITT exercisers to make the leap. When they listened to music, they reported feeling more positive about HITT and their exercise regimen.


HIIT is a time-efficient exercise strategy that involves short periods of intense exercise separated by less-intense recovery periods. The exercise is distinct from more traditional long-duration aerobic exercise, such as jogging continuously for 50 minutes.


"There has been a lot of discussion in the exercise and public policy worlds about how we can get people off the couch and meeting their minimum exercise requirements," says Kathleen Martin Ginis, professor of health and exercise sciences at the University of British Columbia Okanagan Campus.


"The use of HIIT may be a viable option to combat inactivity, but there is a concern that people may find HIIT unpleasant, deterring future participation."


Perhaps surprisingly, researchers found that study participants who engaged in multiple HIIT sessions not only enjoyed the exercise, but they maintained positive attitudes about continuing HIIT in the future.


"Newer research has established that as little as 10 minutes of intense HIIT, three times per week can elicit meaningful health benefits," said researcher Matthew Stork.


"For busy people who may be reluctant to try HIIT for the first time, this research tells us that they can actually enjoy it, and they may be more likely to participate in HIIT again if they try it with music."


The Department of Health and Human Services recommends that healthy adults get at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise, such as brisk walking or mowing the lawn, or 75 minutes of vigorous activity, such as running or aerobic dancing, spread over a week.


A study published earlier this year in JAMA Internal Medicine found that people who met recommended guidelines had a 31 percent less risk of dying during the course of the 14-year period of study than those who didn't exercise.


"Our research aims to learn more about people's perceptions towards HIIT and ultimately determine if people can adhere to these types of exercises in the long term," says Stork.

"With the introduction of HIIT exercise, people may not necessarily require the dreaded 150-minute weekly total."

 

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People who engage in moderate exercise but want to amp up their exercise routines to high-intensity interval training (HITT), may want to add headphones to their routines. Research recently published in the Journal of Sport Sciences found that listening to music appears to...
listening, music, exercise, intense
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2016-04-20
Thursday, 20 October 2016 12:04 PM
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