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Tags: Coronavirus | home repairs | service repairs

How to Let Workers Into Your Home Safely

a man is shown in mask, and other protective gear as he prepares to do work in a home with a man and his son
(John Moore/Getty Images)

By    |   Friday, 29 May 2020 12:21 PM

Everyone who comes into your home is a potential risk for transmitting the coronavirus. So naturally, we’ve limited the number of people arriving at our doorstep.

But appliances break down and you may need a repair service, as well a break from your in-home duties as a mom and home school teacher. How do you safely let a babysitter or other worker into your home during these trying times?

According to CNN, there are several measures that need to be in place, and some of them may become permanent, according to industry experts.

  • More protective personal equipment (PPE). Repair people and cleaners should be suited up with masks, gloves, goggles and shoe coverings. Clients may also be asked to wear masks and stay 6 feet away. Individuals in the high-risk category for coronavirus complications could leave the front door ajar when the worker arrives and then sequester themselves in another room, communicating by phone.
  • Increase sanitation of equipment. Cleaning companies, like Neighborly, the parent company of home service brands such as Molly Maid, Mr. Handyman, Mr. Appliance and Glass Doctor, are switching mop heads and disinfecting tools and other equipment after every job.
  • Caregiver contracts. There has been an increase in the demand for in-home services both for children as parents return to work, and to care for the elderly. Tim Allen, CEO of Care.com, told CNN that while social distancing isn’t possible in these situations, individuals should set the ground rules according to their comfort zone. This may require writing a “nanny contract,” he said, that spells out salaries, personal time off, frequency of hand washing and when to wear masks.
  • Touchless transactions. According to Consumer Reports, you should ask in advance whether you can pay for your services without touching  a surface or writing instrument.
  • Prepare a path. Have the service person follow a pre-planned pathway in your home that allows minimum contact with unnecessary surfaces. Disinfect the work area prior to the visit and then again, afterward.
  • Tip with care. If you want to thank the worker, place the money in a sealed envelope and place it in an area where he or she can personally pick it up, said Consumer Reports.

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Health-News
Everyone who comes into your home is a potential risk for transmitting the coronavirus. So naturally, we’ve limited the number of people arriving at our doorstep.
home repairs, service repairs
367
2020-21-29
Friday, 29 May 2020 12:21 PM
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