Tags: flibanserin | womens | Viagra | FDA | libido

'Women's Viagra' Pushed for FDA Approval

By    |   Monday, 01 Jun 2015 02:37 PM


This week, women may reach another milestone in their quest for equality when the Food and Drug Administration meets to consider recommending the approval of a new drug — a little pink pill called flibanserin. The little pink pill will boost pre-menopausal women's sexual desire, and many consider it the female version of Viagra.

The FDA has rejected flibanserin twice before, citing that the side effects of nausea, dizziness, and sleeplessness outweighed its effectiveness. But Sprout Pharmaceuticals, which owns the drug, and some women's groups accuse the FDA of gender bias. The FDA, they point out, has approved dozens of drugs to enable men to have sex, but not a single one designed for women.

One group called Even The Score says the fight to get FDA approval for flibanserin is a campaign for women’s sexual health equity that was "created to serve as a voice for American women who believe that it’s time to level the playing field when it comes to the treatment of women’s sexual dysfunction.

"We waited long enough," the group says in a petition that has more than 40,000 signatures urging the FDA to approve flibanserin. "It's time to even the score."

Even the Score includes 24 organizations, including the Women's Health Foundation and the National Council of Women's Organizations. "As supporters of the Even the Score campaign," the group says, "we believe that women have the right to make their own informed choices concerning their sexual health; that gender equality should be the standard when it comes to access to treatments for sexual dysfunction; and that the approval of safe and effective treatments for women’s sexual dysfunction should be a priority for action by the FDA."

"We live in a culture that has historically discounted the importance of sexual pleasure and sexual desire for women," Terry O'Neill of the National Organization for Women told NPR. "And I fear that it's that cultural attitude that men's sexual health is extremely important, but women's sexual health is not so important."

The FDA denies any gender bias, and others point out that many of the drugs for men don't address a lack of sexual desire, which usually isn't a problem, but low testosterone, and Viagra increases blood flow to the genital area.

Women haven't been left out completely, say some experts, because of the availability of both estrogen and a drug called ospemifene that treats painful intercourse following menopause.

According to WebMD, about 15 percent to 16 percent of men experience a loss of libido, and least 30 percent of women. Everyday Health reports that as many as 43 percent of women suffer from some form of sexual dysfunction.


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This week, women may reach another milestone in their quest for equality when the Food and Drug Administration meets to consider recommending the approval of a new drug - a little pink pill called flibanserin. The little pink pill will boost pre-menopausal women's sexual...
flibanserin, womens, Viagra, FDA, libido
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2015-37-01
Monday, 01 Jun 2015 02:37 PM
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