Tags: electronic | cigarettes | e-cigarettes | damage | gum | tissue

E-Cigarettes Damage Gum Tissue

E-Cigarettes Damage Gum Tissue

(Copyright Fotolia)

By    |   Thursday, 17 November 2016 11:52 AM

Electronic cigarettes damage gums and teeth just as much as conventional cigarettes, says the first study to address concerns on the detrimental effects of e-cigarettes on dental health.


Electronic cigarettes continue to grow in popularity, partly because they are viewed as a healthier alternative to tobacco cigarettes. At first, scientists agreed, thinking that the chemicals found in cigarette smoke were the culprits behind the bad health effects linked to smoking.


But the study from the University of Rochester Medical Center adds to a growing body of evidence that e-cigarettes are much more detrimental to health than originally thought.


"We showed that when the vapors from an e-cigarette are burned, it causes cells to release inflammatory proteins, which in turn aggravate stress within cells, resulting in damage that could lead to various oral diseases," said study leader Irfan Rahman.


"How much and how often someone is smoking e-cigarettes will determine the extent of damage to the gums and oral cavity."


The study, which was published in Oncotarge, also found that the flavorings added to e-cigarettes made the damage worse, some more so than others. And e-cigarettes also contain nicotine, which is known to harm gum tissue.


Most e-cigarettes contain a battery, a heating device, and a cartridge to hold liquid, which typically contains nicotine, flavorings, and other chemicals. The battery-powered device heats the liquid in the cartridge into an aerosol that the user inhales.


Last year, Rahman published a study detailing the damaging effects of e-cigarette vapors and flavorings on lung cells and an earlier study on the pollution effects.


Earlier this year, researchers at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine found that vaping electronic cigarettes alters the genes that are important for immune defense in the upper airway.


The study, which was published in the American Journal of Physiology, found that inhaling the vaporized flavored liquids in e-cigarettes has consequences similar to smoking tobacco, at least on epithelial cells that line the upper airway of the respiratory tract.


E-cigarettes have only been on the market in the United States since 2006, and usage has skyrocketed. Teens using e-cigarettes jumped 19 percent within a single year, and now more teens use them instead of traditional tobacco cigarettes.

 

© 2019 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Health-News
Electronic cigarettes damage gums and teeth just as much as conventional cigarettes, says the first study to address concerns on the detrimental effects of e-cigarettes on dental health. Electronic cigarettes continue to grow in popularity, partly because they are viewed as...
electronic, cigarettes, e-cigarettes, damage, gum, tissue
370
2016-52-17
Thursday, 17 November 2016 11:52 AM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved