Tags: Alzheimer's/Dementia | diet | dementia

Spicy Diet Linked to Dementia

Red chili peppers
Red chili peppers (Chernetskaya/Dreamstime.com)

By    |   Wednesday, 24 July 2019 08:39 AM

For years, experts have touted the many health benefits of eating hot pepper chili, but now research is suggesting that the opposite could be true. A spicy diet could be linked to dementia.

The findings published in the scientific journal Nutrients are based upon a 15-year study of adults older than 55 who ate more than 50 grams of chili a day.

A team from the University of South Australia found that of the 4,582 participating Chinese adults, those who ate more of the spicy pepper had almost double the risk of memory decline and poor cognition. This was even more prominent in those who were slimmer.

Researchers theorized that this could be because people with normal body weight could be more sensitive to intake of the pepper and more likely to experience its effects on memory and weight.

"Chili consumption was found to be beneficial for body weight and blood pressure in our previous studies. However, in this study, we found adverse effects on cognition among older adults," Dr. Zumin Shi from Qatar University, who headed up the research, said in a statement.

For the study, participants ate fresh and dried chili peppers. The active component, capsaicin, is what experts believe is responsible for speeding up metabolism, contributing toward fat loss and inhibiting vascular disorders.

However, until now there has not been a long-term study that looks at the link that chili intake can have on cognitive function.

Chili peppers are especially popular in Asia and Europe, where they are eaten daily.

The team from the University of South Australia believes the link between a spicy diet and dementia is one that should be further explored.

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For years, experts have touted the many health benefits of eating hot pepper chili, but now research is suggesting that the opposite could be true.
diet, dementia
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2019-39-24
Wednesday, 24 July 2019 08:39 AM
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