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Tags: COVID | vaccines | booster | botox | fillers | swelling

Boosters and Botox: Do Not Mix and Match

a man receives Botox treatment from healthcare practitioner
(Dreamstime)

By    |   Thursday, 06 January 2022 08:42 AM EST

Experts caution that getting a COVID-19 vaccine too close to cosmetic procedures could result in nasty swelling in the treated area.

According to The Wall Street Journal, in rare cases mRNA vaccines have been associated with an inflammatory reaction to the commonly used hyaluronic-based fillers. To be on the safe side, dermatologists and other experts recommend that their patients wait two to three weeks before combining even wrinkle-relaxing injections like Botox with COVID-19 vaccinations or boosters.

“I advise two weeks on either side of a COVID-19 vaccination for any filler or surgical procedure,” Dr. Darren Smith, a New York City-based board certified plastic surgeon, tells Newsmax. “There is a real risk of exacerbated inflammatory reactions to surgery or procedures near this vaccine. Moreover, it is thought that the vaccine can cause a hypercoagulable state for several weeks, increasing the risk of blood clots after some surgeries.”

This advice comes on the heels of recent data compiled by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons reporting a “post-pandemic boom” in cosmetic procedures as people emerge from their homes and offices and start to socialize, says TODAY.

In a survey of more than 100 board certified dermatologists across the country, 56% reported an increase in people seeking cosmetic consultations compared to pre-pandemic times, and 86% said that their patients cited video-conferencing calls as a reason to seek treatments.

While the chances of an adverse reaction from combining vaccines and fillers too close together are small, many practitioners are asking their clients to hold off on cosmetic procedures until after they’ve been vaccinated and boosted just to be on the safe side.

Others, like Dr. Alain Michon, who published research in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology earlier this year, says that the chances of vaccine-induced swelling after cosmetic procedures is less than 1%.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that people who experience swelling after fillers should report it to their healthcare professional. During the Moderna Phase III clinical trial, three cases of facial swelling after dermal procedures were noted.

© 2024 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Health-News
Experts caution that getting a COVID-19 vaccine too close to cosmetic procedures could result in nasty swelling in the treated area. According to The Wall Street Journal, in rare cases mRNA vaccines have been associated with an inflammatory reaction to the commonly used...
COVID, vaccines, booster, botox, fillers, swelling
341
2022-42-06
Thursday, 06 January 2022 08:42 AM
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