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Tags: covid | rash | skin | after | infection | overactive | immune

Why a Rash May Appear After COVID-19 Infection Subsides

close-up of a person's toes that have a red rash as a reaction to COVID-19 infection
(Dreamstime)

By    |   Thursday, 04 August 2022 03:00 PM EDT

People have been reporting skin rashes after COVID-19 infection since the pandemic began. But only recently have experts suggested that the rashes may be triggered more by an immune response than by the virus itself. Once the virus enters the body, it is detected by immune cells that mount a defense against the invader.

For some people, this can be an exaggerated response that causes skin sensitivity and reactivity, causing a rash. According to Healthline, skin rashes could also occur due to the increased blood clotting that sometimes happens in COVID-19, although scientists are still investigating this possibility.

While skin rashes accounted for only 9% of symptoms in people who tested positive for COVID-19, according to The Zoe Health Study's COVID rash gallery, for 21% of respondents, besides a positive test, rashes were the only sign of infection.

The British Association of Dermatologists put together a list of images of potential rashes associated with COVID-19 that corresponds to the Zoe Health Study. The rash could itch, look patchy, look like blisters or pinpoints, or have lace-like patterns. It could even be a toe rash, like the infamous COVID toe that appears discolored and swollen.

But, strangely enough, for some people a skin reaction does not occur until after the infection has subsided and some experts speculate that the rashes aren’t necessarily caused by the virus.

“The skin rash is not directly caused by the virus. It is one of the results of an overactive immune system, leading to an allergic type of rash in some and a vasculitis-like rash in others,” explained Dr. Qian Xu, founder of Skin Aesthetics and an emergency medic.

Dr. Xu said that “it is vital to get the correct diagnosis for your skin rash before starting any treatment. If the rash is driven by something systemic, then just using topical skincare would not be enough to control it, and there’s a chance it could make matters worse.” She added that your doctor can help guide your treatment plan, and in the meantime, if your skin is dry, itchy, or irritated apply simple moisturizers and steer clear of serums or scrubs.

© 2022 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Health-News
People have been reporting skin rashes after COVID-19 infection since the pandemic began. But only recently have experts suggested that the rashes may be triggered more by an immune response than by the virus itself. Once the virus enters the body, it is detected by immune...
covid, rash, skin, after, infection, overactive, immune, reaction
358
2022-00-04
Thursday, 04 August 2022 03:00 PM
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