Tags: Health Topics | cholesterol | arthritis | osteoarthritis | antioxidants

High Cholesterol May Trigger Arthritis

High Cholesterol May Trigger Arthritis

(Dreamstime)

By    |   Wednesday, 19 October 2016 12:57 PM

Add this to the trouble surrounding high cholesterol: Having it could lead to development of osteoarthritis.

New research done with mice and rats makes the connection: High cholesterol can trigger stress on cartilage cells, which die, and in turn, leads to arthritis. The results were published in the journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB).

The first test was done with mice. Scientists introduced a genetically altered gene which gave them high cholesterol.

The rats were fed a high-cholesterol diet, which caused diet-induced high cholesterol.

Some in each group were then fed either a high-cholesterol diet or a normal diet.

All were then given knee injuries via surgery to spur arthritis. Both the mice and the rats that were fed the high-cholesterol diets showed more severe osteoarthritis development than seen in the normal diet group.

When both the mice and the rats were given the cholesterol-lowering drug atorvastatin and mitochondrion-targeted antioxidants, the development of osteoarthritis decreased in relation to the untreated groups.

"Just when we thought all the angles on osteoarthritis had been uncovered, a new lead like this comes along," said Thoru Pederson, editor-in-chief of the journal. "The focus of hypercholesterolemia [high cholesterol], whether familial or sporadic, has, of course, always been on arterial disease; but here we have a fascinating new discovery."

© 2020 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Health-News
Add this to the trouble surrounding high cholesterol: Having it could lead to development of osteoarthritis.
cholesterol, arthritis, osteoarthritis, antioxidants
218
2016-57-19
Wednesday, 19 October 2016 12:57 PM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved