Tags: Health Topics | Anxiety | brain fog | pandemic | distraction | fatigue

The Reason Your Brain is Foggy Right Now

The Reason Your Brain is Foggy Right Now
The constant worry over the coronavirus has scattered our brain power, said Priyank Khandelwal, assistant professor in neurology at the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. (Ikon Images via AP)

By    |   Tuesday, 12 May 2020 03:18 PM

If you are suffering from “brain fog,” feeling tired and unable to focus during the pandemic, you are not alone. Research has shown a correlation between anxiety, distraction and fatigue.

The constant worry over the coronavirus has scattered our brain power, said Priyank Khandelwal, assistant professor in neurology at the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, making us feel that our thoughts are all over the place.

“In medical terms, you can boil ‘brain fog’ into a few things,” the professor told Well + Good. “When somebody’s feeling anxious, and more distracted as a result, then they may feel like they have more of a lack of energy than they do on normal days. That’s what some people describe as brain fog.”

In times of chronic stress, we may experience a variety of symptoms along with brain fog such as a racing heart, tight muscles or sleeplessness, said Molly Colvin, Ph.D., a developmental neuropsychologist at Massachusetts General Hospital and assistant professor of psychology at Harvard Medical School. She told Cognoscenti that brain fog may actually be protective because it reminds us that things are not normal.

“It keeps us from taking on too much or from trying to move too fast in uncertain times,” she wrote. “It allows for cognitive resources to be held in reserve so that capacity can be quickly employed to learn new and adaptive skills.”

Dr. Khandelwal said one way to clear our foggy brains is to face reality.

“Data is coming it to suggest the pandemic may linger on for some time,” he said. “Once people accept this reality, that this is going to be our lifestyle for at least a few months, they’ve reached a feeling of acceptance.”

Acceptance helps clear the mind of disturbing thoughts, he added, and you learn to make the best of the current situation. He advised that getting back to basics can help you deal with brain fog on a daily basis. And that means taking care of your diet, exercise and sleep patterns.

Staying in tune with your favorite foods, games and people, even virtually, can create a new normal for the brain, according to Well + Good. Psychologist Laurie Santos, Ph D, a professor of Yale’s virtual happiness course, says that there is a “fresh start energy” in the air that can help propel us into developing new and better habits. These new patterns can be the lighthouse that leads you through the fog.

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If you are suffering from “brain fog,” feeling tired and unable to focus during the pandemic, you are not alone. Research has shown a correlation between anxiety, distraction and fatigue.
brain fog, pandemic, distraction, fatigue
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2020-18-12
Tuesday, 12 May 2020 03:18 PM
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