Tags: asthma | cure | immune | cells | ILC2 | trigger

Clue to Curing Asthma?

Thursday, 12 Mar 2015 12:43 PM


Scientists have targeted a recently discovered type of cell that causes asthma, which could lead to curing the chronic respiratory disease that affects 235 million people around the world, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).
 
Asthma irritates and narrows the airways, reducing the lung capacity in recurrent attacks of wheezing, which can lead to reduced activity levels, sleeplessness and illness, according to the WHO.
 
Currently, there is no known cure, and causes are unknown, yet the type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) that were discovered are a subset of immune cells that trigger the symptoms of asthma, say the researchers from California in the US.
 
"If we can target ILC2s, we might be able to cure asthma or exacerbations caused by these particular cells," says principal investigator Dr. Omid Akbari, an associate professor of molecular and cellular immunology at the University of Southern California.
 
Dr. Akbari and his team discovered molecules that are key in maintaining the vitality of ILC2s and they believe targeting them would snuff out ILC2s, ridding the patient of his asthma.
 
In the experiment, they developed a humanized mouse model to learn more about the functioning of human ILC2 cells.
 
They remarked that T cell costimulator molecules -- proteins that influence cell behavior and response -- interact with similar variations to help the ILC2 cells thrive.
 
The paper is to be published March 17 in the journal Immunity.
 
Although scientists continue looking for developments that might one day lead to a cure for asthma, recent research suggested that asthmatics are advised to get more sun to potentially minimize their suffering.
 
A recent, large-scale study using data from 307,900 people whose vitamin D levels were measured between 2008 and 2012 says the sunshine's nutrient could regulate immune responses, hindering asthma's control over the body.
 
Working with 21,000 asthma patients, the research team concluded that a deficiency in vitamin D could make them 25 percent more likely than other asthmatics to have had a recent asthma attack.

© AFP/Relaxnews 2017

   
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Scientists have targeted a recently discovered type of cell that causes asthma, which could lead to curing the chronic respiratory disease that affects 235 million people around the world, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Asthma irritates and narrows the...
asthma, cure, immune, cells, ILC2, trigger
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2015-43-12
Thursday, 12 Mar 2015 12:43 PM
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