Tags: Obesity | artificial | sweeteners | ditch | weight | gain | obesity

Why You Should Ditch Artificial Sweeteners ... Now

Image: Why You Should Ditch Artificial Sweeteners ... Now
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By    |   Thursday, 05 Oct 2017 12:39 PM

Instead of helping you control your weight and diabetes, artificial sweeteners may be doing just the opposite — many new studies warn the popular sweeteners actually cause weight gain by tricking your metabolism. In addition, they raise your blood sugar, which can lead to diabetes. Diabetes and obesity are the diseases artificial sweeteners were invented to prevent in the first place!

The latest study, which was published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Journal Association), found that consuming artificial sweeteners may also be linked to high blood pressure and heart disease.

The researchers investigated 37 studies, which included more than 400,000 people, for an average of 10 years. The trials did not show that artificial sweeteners were effective for weight loss, but instead found higher risks of weight gain, obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, and other health problems.

"We found that data from clinical trials do not clearly support the intended benefits of artificial sweeteners for weight management," said study author Dr. Ryan Zarychanski.

Other recent studies have also found that artificial sweeteners add to a host of major health problems instead of helping cope with or avoid them. They include:

• Researchers from Yale University found that dieters who consume artificially sweetened drinks and eat low-calorie dishes may be tricking their metabolism into piling on even more weight which can lead to obesity, heart disease, and diabetes.

The sweetness in naturally sweetened foods helps determine how calories are metabolized. Sweetness tells the body the food contains energy, and the sweeter the food, the more energy the body expects it to contain. But when a beverage is either too sweet or not sweet enough for the number of calories it contains, the brain decreases metabolism.

In addition, the reward circuits in the brain fail to recognize that calories have been consumed, and the dieter is often prompted to eat more, setting the stage for metabolic syndrome, which is associated with obesity, heart disease, and diabetes. The study helps explain other studies which found that instead of losing weight, people who drink diet drinks and use low-calorie sweeteners actually gain more weight than those who avoid them.

• A Boston University School of Medicine study found that people who consumed diet sodas daily were almost three times as likely to develop stroke and dementia as those who drank it no more than once a week.

• An Australian study published in Cell Metabolism found that synthetic sugar substitutes, which include aspartame and saccharine, increased insomnia, hyperactivity, glucose intolerance, and hyperactivity in animal models. They also stimulated the appetite, leading to an increase in calorie consumption of up to 30 percent.

• Research published in Nature found that zero-calorie sweeteners changed the composition and function of bacteria living in the intestines, triggering higher glucose levels. Volunteers who didn't normally eat or drink artificial sweeteners were asked to consume them for a week. At the end of the week, the composition of bacteria in their guts had changed, and many had already begun to develop glucose intolerance, a risk factor for diabetes.

  • A team of researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital found that aspartame (NutraSweet) interferes with the action of an enzyme shown to prevent metabolic syndrome. Mice that drank water spiked with aspartame gained more weight and developed other symptoms of metabolic syndrome, such as high blood sugar, compared to mice fed similar diets that didn't contain aspartame.

In addition, all aspartame-fed mice had higher levels of the inflammatory protein TNF-alpha in their blood, which suggests the kind of systemic inflammation associated with metabolic syndrome.

"Sugar substitutes like aspartame are designed to promote weight loss and decrease the incidence of metabolic syndrome, but a number of studies have suggested that these products don't work very well and may actually make things worse," says researcher Dr. Richard Hodin.

"We found that aspartame blocks a gut enzyme called intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) that we previously showed can prevent obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome," he said, "so we think that aspartame might not work because, even as it is substituting for sugar, it blocks the beneficial aspects of IAP."

An earlier study from the University of Texas found that 59 percent of Americans drink diet sodas regularly hoping to lose weight. Previous studies have also found that diet sodas don't help with weight loss, and a study at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio found those who drank diet sodas were more likely to become overweight than those who drank regular sugary sodas.

Scientists found that for each can of diet soda consumed each day, the risk of obesity increased by 41 percent. After 10 years, those who drank two or more diet sodas a day increased their risk of obesity by 500 percent.

An earlier study from the University of Minnesota, found that a single diet soda daily raised the risk of metabolic syndrome and diabetes by 36 percent.

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Instead of helping you control your weight and diabetes, artificial sweeteners may be doing just the opposite - many new studies warn the popular sweeteners actually cause weight gain by tricking your metabolism. In addition, they raise your blood sugar, which can lead to...
artificial, sweeteners, ditch, weight, gain, obesity
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2017-39-05
Thursday, 05 Oct 2017 12:39 PM
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