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Dr. Mike Roizen
Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: media | mental health | climate change | dr. roizen

Don't Let News Addiction Make You Sick

Michael Roizen, M.D. By Thursday, 22 September 2022 11:34 AM EDT Current | Bio | Archive

American adults are projected to spend 13 hours and 11 minutes a day interacting with media in 2022. That includes information and entertainment on computers, phones, TV, radio, podcasts, and social media.

When do we think, talk, or sleep? The answer seems to be we don’t — at least not enough.

These days, a lot of those media-drenched hours are spent following the news about politics, global affairs, sports, more politics, climate change, and natural disasters. That's turned a whole group of folks into what researchers from the College of Media and Communication at Texas Tech University call "news junkies."

When they surveyed the news-tracking habits of 1,100 U.S. adults, they found that more than 16% of people showed signs of “severely problematic” news consumption.

Those news junkies reported they got so caught up in following current events that it overwhelmed their thoughts, interfered with time spent with family and friends, disrupted work, and made it difficult to sleep.

Among the news-addicted, 73.6% admitted to feeling mentally distressed and 61% reported feeling physically ill quite a bit or very often. People who weren't news-addicted reported negative mental and physical symptoms only around 8% and 6% of the time.

Fortunately, the research also showed the news-addicted can decide to unplug. If you're in too deep, you'll feel better when you turn off the TV, uninstall news apps on the phone and computer, delete social media newsfeeds, or declare certain days "no news" days.

Being a well-informed citizen doesn't have to make you ill.

© King Features Syndicate


DrRoizen
News junkies reported they got so caught up in following current events that it overwhelmed their thoughts, interfered with time spent with family and friends, disrupted work, and made it difficult to sleep.
media, mental health, climate change, dr. roizen
251
2022-34-22
Thursday, 22 September 2022 11:34 AM
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