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Dr. Mike Roizen
Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: genetics | cholesterol | heart attack | dr. roizen

Have You Inherited Cholesterol Problems?

Michael Roizen, M.D. By Monday, 13 June 2022 12:18 PM EDT Current | Bio | Archive

In large airports, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) seizes around 2,000 pounds of prohibited items every month. That's a screening system we're all glad is in place.

Here's another one: genetic screening.

When it's used in combination with clinical criteria such as LDL cholesterol level (or even better, your apolipoprotein B level) and/or the information that a family member had a heart attack at a young age, it can alert you to an inherited trait that causes extremely elevated levels of bad LDL cholesterol. The condition is called familial hypercholesterolemia.

A recent study reveals that if health screenings were combined with genetic testing, more than 1 million Americans with an increased inherited risk could be identified.

One of every 1,000 U.S. adults has one gene for familial hypercholesterolemia. Those people are, on average, at risk for a heart attack at age 50 (men) and age 60 (women). That compares to age 66 for men and age 72 for women without the predisposing gene.

And if you happen to have two genes for the disorder, cholesterol and cardiovascular problems will start earlier — and so does heart disease.

Unfortunately, there's no national screening program to identify who's at risk. So it's up to you.

If you're 16 or older, get a test for your level of apolipoprotein B and cholesterol. Find out if anyone related to you has had a heart attack before age 60.

If that's the case and you have elevated apolipoprotein B and/or LDL, talk to your doctor about lifestyle and medication steps to save your life.

© King Features Syndicate


DrRoizen
A recent study reveals that if health screenings were combined with genetic testing, more than 1 million Americans with an increased inherited risk could be identified.
genetics, cholesterol, heart attack, dr. roizen
258
2022-18-13
Monday, 13 June 2022 12:18 PM
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