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Dr. Mike Roizen
Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: covid | infection | vaccination | dr. roizen

Good News and Bad News on COVID

Michael Roizen, M.D. By Wednesday, 22 June 2022 11:36 AM EDT Current | Bio | Archive

A study once showed that when given the choice, people prefer to hear bad news first, and good news after that. But news givers are inclined to deliver good news first.

When it comes to long COVID and breakthrough infections among people who are vaccinated, you win: Here's the bad news first.

According to a study published in the journal Nature Medicine, about a third of people who have been fully vaccinated (but not boosted) and then experience a breakthrough infection develop long COVID. That means they’re more likely to contend with cardiovascular, coagulation and hematologic, gastrointestinal, kidney, mental health, metabolic, musculoskeletal, and/or neurologic disorders 30 or more days after infection than those who have never had COVID-19. 

The good news? The study shows that that being vaccinated leads to a 15% reduction in long COVID symptoms related to lung and blood clot disorders for up to six months after a breakthrough infection.

The study that generated these findings looked at almost 40,000 people in the Veterans Affairs database and found that around 10.65 of every 1,000 people who were fully vaccinated developed a breakthrough infection.

Their conclusion: While vaccination offers some protection, it is still important to protect yourself from possible infection.

I suggest that handwashing and mask-wearing don't take much effort, but the protection they offer may be life-changing, even if you're vaccinated.

And get boosted twice if you qualify. Most likely, it gives you a lot more protection from a breakthrough.

© King Features Syndicate


DrRoizen
A study shows that that being vaccinated leads to a 15% reduction in long COVID symptoms related to lung and blood clot disorders for up to six months after a breakthrough infection.
covid, infection, vaccination, dr. roizen
244
2022-36-22
Wednesday, 22 June 2022 11:36 AM
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