Tags: proton pump inhibitor | ulcer | H. pylori | Dr. Oz

Use Acid Blocking Meds Wisely

By and
Friday, 01 December 2017 03:26 PM Current | Bio | Archive

In the 1970s TV sitcom "Sanford and Son," whenever Fred Sanford (Redd Foxx) got disagreeable news — usually about a failed moneymaking scheme — he'd place his hand over his heart and exclaim: "This is the big one! I'm coming, Elizabeth."

Of course, there was nothing wrong with the character's heart.

A serious flare of acid reflux can feel like a heart attack. Luckily, proton pump inhibitors and histamine 2 blockers ease the discomfort.

But a new study in the journal Gut found that folks who use PPIs (Prevacid, Prilosec, and Nexium) for extended stretches are at risk of developing stomach cancer, even after taking antibiotics to eliminate H. pylori infection, a known cause of stomach cancer.

The risk goes up fivefold after more than a year on the meds, more than six-fold after two-plus years, and over eight-fold after three-plus.

Another study indicated that prolonged PPI use is associated with a doubling of heart attack risk. H2 blockers such as Pepcid and Zantac were found to have no link to stomach cancer or increased heart attack risk.

The scoop: PPIs are generally safe if taken as directed. Prilosec advises you to use the product once every 24 hours, for up to 14 days; four months later, you may repeat a 14-day course. But many folks use over-the-counter PPIs for months or years.

The right moves:

1. Don't take PPIs for extended periods of time without your doc's permission.

2. Try easing heartburn by making changes to your diet and reducing alcohol or coffee intake.

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A new study in the journal Gut found that folks who use proton pump inhibitors for extended stretches are at risk of developing stomach cancer.
proton pump inhibitor, ulcer, H. pylori, Dr. Oz
253
2017-26-01
Friday, 01 December 2017 03:26 PM
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