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Never Too Young to Watch Your Cholesterol

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Monday, 02 Mar 2015 11:01 AM Current | Bio | Archive

 
When the band Heart sings "Heartless," we don't think they intend to deliver a medical message. But the opening lines, "The doctor said, 'Come back again next week/I think that you need me," are a good prescription for many of the vintage band's 20-to-40-year-old fans.
 
According to a new study from Duke University, younger adults with even moderately elevated LDL cholesterol (above 110 mg/dL) are at increased risk for serious heart disease later in life. And some sources say that around 10 percent of 20-to-35-year-olds have high LDL cholesterol.
 
But young adults rarely get screened for elevated LDL, even when they have additional risk factors for premature heart troubles, such as a family history of high cholesterol, being overweight or obese, smoking, or having diabetes or high blood pressure.
 
So listen up! Everyone 20 or older should have LDL and HDL cholesterol measured every five years. And even if your LDL is only slightly elevated, it's a good time to rein it in.
 
What can you do? Get 30 additional minutes of physical activity daily; lose 5 percent of your body weight if you're overweight; stop smoking or being around tobacco or electronic cigs; maintain blood pressure below 140/80; and sleep 7-8 hours nightly.
 
You even might be a candidate for a statin. Dr. Steven Nissen, a renowned cardiologist, says insisting that statins are just for folks 40 and older doesn't seem sensible. What is sensible? Doing everything you can to protect your heart — at any age.

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According to a new study from Duke University, younger adults with even moderately elevated LDL cholesterol (above 110 mg/dL) are at increased risk for serious heart disease later in life.
cholesterol, heart disease, exercise, Dr. Oz
247
2015-01-02
Monday, 02 Mar 2015 11:01 AM
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