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Will Glucosamine Help My Arthritis?

By    |   Tuesday, 04 Nov 2014 05:35 PM

Question: I have arthritis in my knees and have been thinking about taking glucosamine. Is there any evidence that it works?
 
Dr. Hibberd's answer:
 
There is some evidence that glucosamine may be helpful to some with osteoarthritis. But the evidence is spotty at best. Often a trial of treatment is the only way to find out for sure.
 
Since osteoarthritis of the knees is usually associated with inflammation in an intact knee joint, milder conservative management is the general rule. Glucosamine use is by far left to the discretion of you and your doctor. There is little downside to its use while you are symptomatic, and anti-inflammatories or joint injections can be added if Tylenol (500 milligrams, four times a day) is not effective to control pain.
 
Inflammation is common but bone destruction is rarely seen. You are usually free to combine glucosamine with most prescribed agents. Be sure to evaluate its effectiveness after a three-week trial of therapy.

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Dr-Hibberd
There is some evidence that glucosamine may be helpful to some with osteoarthritis.
glucosamine, arthritis
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2014-35-04
Tuesday, 04 Nov 2014 05:35 PM
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