Robert G. Silverman, DC, DACBN, DCBCN, MS, CCN, CNS, CSCS, CIISN, CKTP, CES, HKC, FAKTR

Dr. Robert G. Silverman is a chiropractic doctor, clinical nutritionist and author of, “Inside-Out Health: A Revolutionary Approach to Your Body,” an Amazon No. 1 bestseller in 2016. The ACA Sports Council named Dr. Silverman “Sports Chiropractor of the Year” in 2015. He also maintains a busy private practice as founder of Westchester Integrative Health Center, which specializes in the treatment of joint pain using functional nutrition along with cutting-edge, science-based, nonsurgical approaches.

Dr. Silverman is also on the advisory board for the Functional Medicine University and is a seasoned health and wellness expert on both the speaking circuits and within the media. He has appeared on FOX News Channel, FOX, NBC, CBS, CW affiliates as well as The Wall Street Journal and NewsMax, to name a few. He was invited as a guest speaker on “Talks at Google” to discuss his current book. As a frequent published author in peer-reviewed journals and other mainstream publications, including Integrative Practitioner, MindBodyGreen, Muscle and Fitness, The Original Internist and Holistic Primary Care journals, Dr. Silverman is a thought leader in his field and practice.

Tags: small intestine | bacteria | toxins | fatigue

Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth

By
Friday, 19 July 2019 01:55 PM Current | Bio | Archive

The small intestine is a harsh environment for bacteria. Some do thrive there, but the bulk of the gut bacteria are found in the colon.

Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) happens when colon bacteria travel to the small intestine and take hold, or when the bacteria naturally found in the small intestine increase too much.

SIBO symptoms include bloating and flatulence, diarrhea or constipation, abdominal pain, nausea, and fatigue.

SIBO can be a complication of conditions such as diabetes, IBS, and concussion, but it can also occur as a result of antibiotic use, proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use, low stomach acid, decreased bile acids, and alcohol use.

A low-fiber diet slows movement in the small intestine and can lead to SIBO. Getting older and being female are also risk factors.

The excess bacteria in the small intestine can gobble up nutrients before they can be absorbed.

In addition,cytolethal distending toxins from the harmful bacteria damage the epithelial layer, causing leaky gut from damaged tight junctions, damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and systemic inflammation.

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The small intestine is a harsh environment for bacteria. Some do thrive there, but the bulk of the gut bacteria are found in the colon.
small intestine, bacteria, toxins, fatigue
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2019-55-19
Friday, 19 July 2019 01:55 PM
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