Robert G. Silverman, DC, DACBN, DCBCN, MS, CCN, CNS, CSCS, CIISN, CKTP, CES, HKC, FAKTR

Dr. Robert G. Silverman is a chiropractic doctor, clinical nutritionist and author of, “Inside-Out Health: A Revolutionary Approach to Your Body,” an Amazon No. 1 bestseller in 2016. The ACA Sports Council named Dr. Silverman “Sports Chiropractor of the Year” in 2015. He also maintains a busy private practice as founder of Westchester Integrative Health Center, which specializes in the treatment of joint pain using functional nutrition along with cutting-edge, science-based, nonsurgical approaches.

Dr. Silverman is also on the advisory board for the Functional Medicine University and is a seasoned health and wellness expert on both the speaking circuits and within the media. He has appeared on FOX News Channel, FOX, NBC, CBS, CW affiliates as well as The Wall Street Journal and NewsMax, to name a few. He was invited as a guest speaker on “Talks at Google” to discuss his current book. As a frequent published author in peer-reviewed journals and other mainstream publications, including Integrative Practitioner, MindBodyGreen, Muscle and Fitness, The Original Internist and Holistic Primary Care journals, Dr. Silverman is a thought leader in his field and practice.

Tags: omega-3 | fish oil | DHA | EPA

Types of Omega-3 Fatty Acids

By
Thursday, 07 March 2019 04:14 PM Current | Bio | Archive

There are three types of omega-3 fatty acids: alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).

ALA is an 18-carbon long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (SCPUFA), sourced primarily from plants. ALA provides a source of energy when metabolized, and because the body can’t make ALA, it’s considered an essential nutrient.

In humans, ALA undergoes an elongation step into the second form of omega-3, EPA. However, it is a poor source of EPA due to a low conversion efficiency of only about 5 to 10 percent.

EPA, meanwhile, is a 20-carbon long chain (LCPUFA) known for its biologic activity in humans. Supporting a variety of functions including brain health and heart health, EPA can also elongate into the third form of omega-3, known as DHA.

DHA is a 22-carbon long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid known as a physiologically-essential LCPUFA. While possible, conversion efficiency of ALA through to DHA is extremely low, typically occurring with an efficiency of just 0.2 to 2 percent.

Therefore, the best way to incorporate these essential nutrients into your diet is to eat fish rich in omega-3s. However, not all fatty fish are created equally. SMASH fish — that is, salmon, mackerel, anchovies, sardines, and herring — are not only packed with omega-3s, they’re also safer to eat thanks to low amounts of mercury.

Comparatively, high-mercury fish such as tuna, swordfish, orange roughy, and shark are typically larger in size because they  tend to live longer — two factors that increase their exposure to mercury.

While good sources of omega-3s, these fish should be eaten in moderation (or not at all) due to their mercury levels.

Throughout history, humans consumed diets heavy in fish. Today, fish consumption is low. Thanks to western diets, these essential nutrients have become a nutritional deficit for many. Thus, a dietary solution is needed.

© 2019 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Dr-Silverman
There are three types of omega-3 fatty acids: alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).
omega-3, fish oil, DHA, EPA
301
2019-14-07
Thursday, 07 March 2019 04:14 PM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved