Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

 

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: womens health | heart attack symptoms | Dr. Oz

Women's Heart Risk Is Increasing

By and
Tuesday, 25 June 2019 11:59 AM Current | Bio | Archive

Actress Elizabeth Banks (who plays Effie Trinket in “The Hunger Games” movies) once appeared in a public service announcement called “A Little Heart Attack,” which was about a working mother of two who is unaware she's experiencing a cardiac event.

Banks' character is so absorbed in multitasking — doing the laundry, taking a work phone call, making lunch for her kids — that she never asks herself what's causing her excessive sweating, nausea, jaw tightening, and breathlessness.

Her son Googles “women's heart attack symptoms” and eventually she calls 911, saying she's sorry to be a bother, but she thinks she's had “a little heart attack.”

That “forging ahead” approach to heart health isn't uncommon for women. One study found that women wait 37 minutes longer than men to seek treatment for a heart attack.

That's not smart, especially because middle-age women are increasingly hard-hit by heart disease.

According to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2017 the death rates from heart disease in women ages 45 to 64 increased by 7%, compared with 3% for men.

If you’re not up to speed on women's heart attack symptoms (only about 56% of women know heart disease is their No. 1 killer), they include the traditional ones like chest pressure and chest pain, as well as sore left arm, nausea, vomiting, lightheadedness, sweatiness, discomfort in the jaw, neck, and/or shoulders, severe fatigue, bad indigestion, and even a sense of impending doom.

If you think you're having a heart attack, call 911. Don't tough it out. Better safe than sorry.

© King Features Syndicate

   
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Dr-Oz
According to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2017 the death rates from heart disease in women ages 45 to 64 increased by 7%, compared with 3% for men.
womens health, heart attack symptoms, Dr. Oz
261
2019-59-25
Tuesday, 25 June 2019 11:59 AM
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