Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

 

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Tags: sunglasses | ultraviolet rays | cataracts | dr. oz

What Do You Know About Sunglasses?

By and Monday, 31 August 2020 11:24 AM Current | Bio | Archive

Paul Hines played for Major League Baseball’s Providence Grays way back in 1878. He's known for three remarkable achievements: the first recorded unassisted triple play, the first Triple Crown, and being the first player to wear sunglasses on the field.

Since then, the science of protecting your eyes from the sun has come a long way. But according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, a lot of people still don't know how to determine if sunglasses are protecting their eyes from serious damage.

Ultraviolet A and B rays increase your risk of developing cataracts, growths on the eye, and cancer, and may worsen glare if you have glaucoma.

Take this quiz to see how sunglass-savvy you are:

1. Polarized, dark, and/or tinted lenses offer increased protection from sun damage. True or false?

2. Sunglasses are only for sunny days. True or false?

3. Cheap sunglasses don’t offer protection. True or false?

You also scored an unassisted triple play if you said all three are false.

• Polarized lenses don't block more radiation, they block glare. Darker and tinted lenses also don't cut out UV rays more effectively, although they can make it easier to see a ball in motion. Make sure your glasses say they block 100% of UV-A and UV-B, or say 100% UV 400 protection.

• UV light gets through clouds and haze. Wear sunglasses daily.

• Less-expensive sunglasses marked as 100% UV-blocking are as effective as more expensive options. 

© King Features Syndicate


   
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Ultraviolet A and B rays increase your risk of developing cataracts, growths on the eye, and cancer, and may worsen glare if you have glaucoma.
sunglasses, ultraviolet rays, cataracts, dr. oz
242
2020-24-31
Monday, 31 August 2020 11:24 AM
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