×
Newsmax TV & Webwww.newsmax.comFREE - In Google Play
VIEW
×
Newsmax TV & Webwww.newsmax.comFREE - On the App Store
VIEW
Drs. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Mike Roizen
Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

 

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: summer | dehydration | heatstroke | dr. oz

Staying Cool in the Heat Wave

Thursday, 12 August 2021 04:53 PM

Martha and the Vandellas sang about the torment of a "Heat Wave" in their 1963 hit: "It's like a heat wave/burnin' in my heart/ It's like a heat wave/It's tearin' me apart."

They did a pretty good job of predicting the effect of the scorching temperatures the U.S. has been experiencing this summer.

At least 67 weather stations from Washington State through New Mexico have recorded their hottest temperatures ever, according to the National Weather Service. And as risky as that is for the earth's future, it also poses an immediate threat to you.

High temperatures can cause dehydration, heatstroke, heat exhaustion, and heat cramps; strain the cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and even increase interpersonal conflict. Research also shows strong links between climate crises and development of depression, anxiety, and PTSD.

So how can you stay cool, calm, and collected when it's steamy outside?

• Don't use an electric fan when the indoor air temperature is more than 95 degrees. The breeze can actually cause your body to gain heat instead of losing it.

• If you have air conditioning, use it or go to an air-conditioned building or cooling center. For locations, Google "cooling centers (and the name of your town)." And wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing.

• In a cool environment, drink a tall glass of plain water every couple of hours. In the heat, have a water bottle with you and sip every 10-15 minutes. Nothing sugary.

• Exercise indoors in a cool place. 

© King Features Syndicate


Dr-Oz
High temperatures can cause dehydration, heatstroke, heat exhaustion, and heat cramps; strain the cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and even increase interpersonal conflict.
summer, dehydration, heatstroke, dr. oz
247
2021-53-12
Thursday, 12 August 2021 04:53 PM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
Join the Newsmax Community
Read and Post Comments
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
 
Find Your Condition
TOP

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved