Drs. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Mike Roizen
Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: sodium | blood pressure | diabetes | dr. oz
OPINION

Is Medication Raising Your Sodium Level?

Dr. Mehmet Oz, M.D. and Dr. Mike Roizen, M.D. By Friday, 21 June 2024 12:28 PM EDT Current | Bio | Archive

If you have Type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure, you want to do everything you can to reduce your risks for heart attack and stroke. In addition to complying with your doctor's prescribed treatments, that means getting plenty of exercise, eating a heart-friendly diet, and making sure you don't ingest too little or too much salt.

But even the most conscientious people may be sabotaging their hard work. That's because many medications deliver a good dose of (hidden) sodium.

A study in the journal PLOS One shows that whether you're getting a high dose for less than a week (around 1,600 mg daily from meds) or a low dose taken frequently over a couple of years, sodium can lead to cardiovascular complications, especially if you already have high blood pressure or diabetes.

Another study confirms this. It found that high levels of sodium in medications cause nonfatal heart attacks, strokes, and newly developed high blood pressure for around a quarter of the people who take them.

Medications with the highest doses of sodium are effervescent compounds such as 500 mg of effervescent acetaminophen, with 440 mg of sodium. A 500 mg dose of non-fizzy acetaminophen contains 390 ng of sodium.

Soluble ibuprofen and vitamin and mineral supplements such as ascorbic acid and zinc sulfate also sneak sodium into your daily diet.

If your blood pressure rose after you started taking any medication, ask your doctor if its sodium content could be to blame.

And if you're struggling to lower your blood pressure with antihypertensive medication, investigate the sodium content of your other supplements and meds to see if they are working against you.

© King Features Syndicate


Dr-Oz
Levels of sodium in medications cause nonfatal heart attacks, strokes, and newly developed high blood pressure for around a quarter of the people who take them.
sodium, blood pressure, diabetes, dr. oz
274
2024-28-21
Friday, 21 June 2024 12:28 PM
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