Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

 

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: sleep | memory cognitive decline | Dr. Oz

Lack of Sleep Takes Toll on Brain

By and
Friday, 05 April 2019 12:12 PM Current | Bio | Archive

In the film “Bedtime for Bonzo,” when college professor Peter Boyd (Ronald Reagan) attempts to demonstrate that he can teach a chimpanzee (Bonzo) right from wrong, the chimp seems to enjoy the instruction.

One important lesson he's taught: When it's time to hit the hay, that means lights out.

Can humans today learn the lesson professor Boyd was trying to teach Bonzo back in in 1951 — that getting to bed on time, with no TV or screen time, is essential for good brain health?

Unfortunately, many people are late-night viewers. A University of Pennsylvania study found that late-night TV (11:30 p.m. to 2 a.m.) is a major reason why up to 40 percent of U.S. adults don't get the recommended seven to eight hours of sleep nightly.

And lack of sleep takes a toll on your brain. A recent study in Nature Scientific Reports reveals that adults 50 and older who, over a six-year stretch, watched more than 3.5 hours of TV daily experienced a greater cognitive decline than adults who watched 2.5 hours a day or less.

That affects a lot of people, as according to a 2016 Nielsen report, American adults watch an average of five hours and four minutes of television per day

Now, there's nothing wrong with watching “The Dr. Oz Show” (recorded or otherwise) and learning how to feel younger. But no TV in the bedroom.

In addition, keep your overall tube time to less than 2.5 hours per day.

Don't let it keep you up at night, and you'll remember better what you watched.

© King Features Syndicate

   
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A recent study reveals that adults 50 and older who, over a six-year stretch, watched more than 3.5 hours of TV daily experienced a greater cognitive decline than adults who watched 2.5 hours a day or less.
sleep, memory cognitive decline, Dr. Oz
260
2019-12-05
Friday, 05 April 2019 12:12 PM
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