Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

 

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Tags: radish | nitric oxide | circulation | Dr. Oz

'Monster Radish' Boosts Circulation

By and Wednesday, 05 September 2018 11:23 AM Current | Bio | Archive

Sacagawea was a Shoshone Indian who helped guide Lewis and Clark's 1805 expedition from Montana to the Pacific. Her bravery and navigational abilities are legendary.

In fact, the route she advised for crossing of the Continental Divide — the Yellowstone River Basin — later became the route for the Northern Pacific Railway.

Now it seems that the Sakurajima daikon (from Sakurajima, Japan), otherwise known as the "monster radish," can use its legendary health properties to guide you to a healthier heart.

The largest Sakurajima radish on record weighed more than 68 pounds with a circumference of more than 3 feet — hence the moniker “monster.”

Researchers writing in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry found that, bite for bite, the monster radish induced more nitric oxide production than its smaller cousins.

When nitric oxide is released into the bloodstream, it causes blood vessels to relax, reducing blood pressure and improving the flow of your circulatory system.

So, like Sacagawea, the Sakurajima radish improves navigation. Only this time, it’s the flow of blood throughout your body.

It may be tough to find the Sakurajima radish in grocery stores (they're grayish-white and the size of pumpkins), but you could come across them at a farmers’ market, and you can also grow your own.

Non-GMO seeds are easily purchased online. These behemoths are a little tough, so they're better when cooked or fermented (that's how the Japanese prepare them), and that should give you the extra benefit of ingesting a microbiome-enhancer.

And the greens, either raw or sauteed, are delicious.

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Researchers writing in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry found that, bite for bite, the monster radish induced more nitric oxide production than its smaller cousins.
radish, nitric oxide, circulation, Dr. Oz
255
2018-23-05
Wednesday, 05 September 2018 11:23 AM
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