Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

 

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: obesity | migraines | C-reactive protein | Dr. Oz

The Obesity-Migraine Connection

By and
Friday, 10 May 2019 12:07 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Historians say that the swirling patterns in Vincent Van Gogh's “Starry Night” illustrate what the artist saw during his migraine auras.

But migraine is more than a headache that can bring on visions; it's linked to a constellation of medical conditions that make up metabolic syndrome — including high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and obesity.

In fact, people who are obese are 81% more likely to be afflicted with episodic migraine headaches than healthy-weight people.

Happily, researchers from the University of Padova in Italy have figured out that if you have migraine headaches and are overweight, shedding extra pounds will reduce the number of days per month you have a migraine, how long an attack lasts, and its severity.

Losing weight may reduce your risk of migraine because weight loss reduces body-wide inflammation. The inflammatory protein called “high sensitivity C-reactive protein” is 11% higher in people who suffer from migraines.

Weight loss also makes it easier to become more active. Lack of physical activity is associated with as much as a 50% higher risk for migraine.

So if you're overweight and have migraines, talk to your doctor about working with a nutritionist to help you shed those extra pounds; some research indicates that the ketogenic diet that's helpful to some people with epilepsy also helps control migraine.

If your weight gain has happened since you started taking migraine-control medications (valproic acid, amitriptyline, and flunarizine are associated with substantial weight gain), ask your doctor about trying another therapy.

© King Features Syndicate

   
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Dr-Oz
Migraine is more than a headache; it's linked to a constellation of medical conditions that make up metabolic syndrome — including high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and obesity.
obesity, migraines, C-reactive protein, Dr. Oz
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2019-07-10
Friday, 10 May 2019 12:07 PM
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