Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

 

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Tags: obesity | diabetes | teenagers | Dr. Oz

How to Talk to Teens About Weight

By and Thursday, 02 January 2020 12:07 PM Current | Bio | Archive

In the movie “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,” an overweight kid named Augustus Gloop makes a beeline for a river of melted chocolate.

His frantic mother calls out, “Augustus, sweetheart, save some room for later!”

But Augustus is undeterred and falls into the swirling sweet, suffering a terrible fate.

It's not easy for parents to know how to change an obese child's eating habits, although it's vital that they do.

That’s because not only can childhood obesity trigger premature high blood pressure and diabetes, new research from Brazil's University of Sao Paolo reveals that it also damages the brain.

Using imaging to observe brain white matter of 59 obese kids ages 12-16, researchers found harmful obesity-related changes in areas of the white matter responsible for appetite control, emotions, and cognitive functions.

If your child is obese or is headed in that direction, you want to rescue good health from bad choices. The Cleveland Clinic suggests:

• Don't mention weight or size. One study found that it makes kids more likely to use unhealthy weight-control techniques. Focus on healthiness and how activities like walking can be a powerful way to take charge of one's future. Kids like to be their own boss.

• Build self-esteem. Provide positive feedback to your child about all endeavors and activities.

The American Academy of Nutrition adds that actions speak louder than words. Make lifestyle changes as a family; upgrade your dietary habits; go shopping with the kids for fresh veggies and fruits.

In addition, you can cook and take part in physical activities together.

And remember: Patience, persistence, and love are the best ingredients.

© King Features Syndicate


Dr-Oz
Not only can childhood obesity trigger premature high blood pressure and diabetes, new research from Brazil's University of Sao Paolo reveals that it also damages the brain.
obesity, diabetes, teenagers, Dr. Oz
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2020-07-02
Thursday, 02 January 2020 12:07 PM
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