Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

 

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: NSAIDs | pain | atrial fibrillation | Dr. Oz

New Warning About Anti-Inflammatory Drug

Dr. Mehmet Oz looks forward
(AP)

By and
Thursday, 04 October 2018 10:54 AM Current | Bio | Archive

Voltar was a Viking comic-book character in an award-winning comic-book series by the same name. It first appeared in 1963.

He was the precursor of Conan the Barbarian, who, when brought to the silver screen in 1982, launched the movie career of Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Voltaren, on the other hand, is a U.S. brand name for a strong-armed NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) called diclofenac, which has recently been called out by Danish researchers in a study published by the journal BMJ.

It turns out that diclofenac users showed a 20 percent greater rate of "atrial fibrillation, ischemic stroke, heart failure, heart attack, or heart-related death in the 30 days following their prescription fill" than those who took acetaminophen or ibuprofen.

Diclofenac is available over-the-counter and by prescription in America — but as always, your best bet is to minimize your use of any anti-inflammatory drugs. Stomach and intestinal bleeding are potential risks associated with all NSAIDs.

If you have chronic pain, try to reduce or eliminate it without medications.

• For acute tissue or bone pain, try R.I.C.E. (rest, ice, compression and elevation).

• To reduce pain-increasing stress before or after an operation, practice mindful meditation for 10 minutes twice daily.

• Go for physical therapy, which should include stretches and exercises, as well as heat for loosening up and ice for cooling down.

If you still need to take pain-relieving meds, ask your doc about seeing a pain management specialist to help you get through this safely and effectively.

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Diclofenac users showed a 20 percent greater rate of "atrial fibrillation, ischemic stroke, heart failure, heart attack, or heart-related death in the 30 days following their prescription fill."
NSAIDs, pain, atrial fibrillation, Dr. Oz
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2018-54-04
Thursday, 04 October 2018 10:54 AM
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