Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

 

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: measles | vaccine | antibodies | Dr. Oz

Measles Vaccine: Not Perfect, But Essential

By and
Tuesday, 07 May 2019 12:18 PM Current | Bio | Archive

In the 2007 film “I Am Legend,” an American virologist (Will Smith) lives in post-apocalyptic New York City, where a genetically re-engineered measles virus (created to cure cancer) has mutated and turned everyone but him into a zombie.

He is somehow immune to the virus, and plans to use his own blood to stop it in its tracks.

In reality, the only way to stop measles in its tracks is with the MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine, which is both safe and effective. It's the reason why the disease was declared eradicated in the U.S. in 2000.

While only about 1 person in 10 million has a serious problem from the vaccine, for every 10,000 people who get the vaccine, one person is prevented from having a life-threatening or disabling reaction to the disease.

America is currently facing multistate measles outbreaks that show no signs of slowing down, thanks to false information about vaccine risks and an increase in international travel.

If you're an adult born after 1957 (before that, almost everyone had the measles) and unsure if you were vaccinated, ask your doctor for a blood test that detects measles antibodies.

If you weren't vaccinated, get the two-shot MMR now. Even if you were vaccinated, people born between 1957 and 1989 generally had one dose and should get the second dose, which will boost immunity from 93% to 97%.

In addition, nonimmunized people, including babies, gain protection if vaccinated within 72 hours of exposure.

© King Features Syndicate

   
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America is currently facing multistate measles outbreaks that show no signs of slowing down, thanks to false information about vaccine risks and an increase in international travel.
measles, vaccine, antibodies, Dr. Oz
245
2019-18-07
Tuesday, 07 May 2019 12:18 PM
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