Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

 

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Tags: liver disease | cancer | diabetes | Dr. Oz

Overweight Teens Risk Liver Disease

By and Monday, 17 April 2017 04:26 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Dontari Poe, the Atlanta Falcons nose tackle and two-time Pro Bowler, came into the NFL combine at 346 pounds — and could run the 40-yard dash in 4.98 seconds.

A super-big, super-fast lineman makes for a great player. But according to new research, packing on extra pounds is not so great for a young man's liver down the line.

We know that when teenagers are overweight, they're looking at an increased risk for Type 2 diabetes and heart disease later in life.

Now research shows that those extra pounds also increase the risk of serious liver problems as an adult.

For the study, published in Gut, researchers analyzed health records of 1.2 million Swedish men from the time they were young adolescents through adulthood. They found that the higher a boy's body mass index (BMI) in the later teenage years, the higher his chances of developing severe liver disease and even liver cancer.

And the risk of liver problems is even greater for young men with Type 2 diabetes.

If your child is overweight or already has Type 2 diabetes, you need to act now to help ensure a healthy, productive future for him or her. That means changing the way your family shops for, prepares and eats food.

Get the kids involved and get creative. Prepare smaller meals and have a family activity plan that includes after-meal walks and weekend adventures to local parks.

Then work with your doctor to monitor your child's liver health (a simple blood test will do it), and you'll catch any problems before they develop.

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When teenagers are overweight, they're looking at an increased risk for Type 2 diabetes and heart disease later in life. New research shows that extra pounds also increase the risk of serious liver problems.
liver disease, cancer, diabetes, Dr. Oz
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2017-26-17
Monday, 17 April 2017 04:26 PM
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