Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

 

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: greens | folate | vitamin E | Dr. Oz

Go for Greens to Delay Aging

By and
Wednesday, 31 January 2018 04:20 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Between 1984 and 2010 there were four movies titled "Green." They ranged in subject matter from a bad LSD trip and living rural (1984), to making money running a marijuana business (2010).

All are rated one star.

Somehow the movie makers missed the news that the real power of green is to fuel your brain.

A new study in Neurology of 960 older folks — average age 81 — found that the top 20 percent of leafy green eaters delayed their cognitive aging by 11 years compared with the 20 percent of folks who had never seen a salad they liked (they ate less than a tenth of a serving of leafy greens daily).

The nutrients in green leafy veggies — such as spinach, collard greens, kale, bok choy, turnip greens, dark lettuce, watercress, arugula, and mesclun — that are the brain boosters include vitamin K, lutein, beta carotene, nitrate, folate, the flavonol kaempferol, and a form of vitamin E called alpha-tocopherol.

So what should you do to get the full recommended amount of seven to nine daily servings of veggies and fruits?

• Eat at least three to four servings of dark-green leafy vegetables; get the rest of your veggies from a variety of colors to maximize your nutrient intake. Opt for at least two servings of fruit (a whole small apple, 1 cup chopped melon) daily.

• Raw green leafy veggies: 1 cup is 1 serving. Cooked green leafy veggies: 1/2 cup is a serving because they cook down.

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Dr-Oz
The nutrients in green leafy veggies that are the brain boosters include vitamin K, lutein, beta carotene, nitrate, folate, the flavonol kaempferol, and a form of vitamin E called alpha-tocopherol.
greens, folate, vitamin E, Dr. Oz
247
2018-20-31
Wednesday, 31 January 2018 04:20 PM
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