Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

 

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: emotional health | cortisol | oxytocin | dr. oz

Kind Words Have Physical Benefits

By and Wednesday, 13 January 2021 11:48 AM Current | Bio | Archive

"HuggieBot 1.0" is a machine that provides a substitute for loving hugs that the world is short on during this pandemic. And despite its inanimate nature, many people enjoy its embrace, according to Alexis Block, the developer at the Max Plank Institute for Intelligent Systems.

But if the idea of an automated hug seems kind of nuts (and bolts), there's good news from Ohio State University's department of psychology.

In a paper published online in the Journal of Positive Psychology, researchers found that simply validating someone's negative emotions (sadness, confusion, anger, boredom, frustration, etc.) can boost their mood and provide the kind of calming reassurance that a hug transmits.

Validating: "Of course you'd be confused about that" or "I get that you feel angry."

Invalidating: "Why would that make you angry?" or "Get over it."

Research shows hugs reduce levels of the stress hormone cortisol and boost the bonding hormone oxytocin, lowering blood pressure and improving your mood.

Validation can do the same, offering a way for someone you care about to cool down and feel understood and appreciated.

And you reap rewards too: You become part of a caring circle, which is the foundation of good emotional health.

Study after study also has found that people with solid emotional connections have better long-term health.

So if you're stuck with Zoom embraces for the time being, be reassured that your understanding and care, even if delivered digitally, can encircle another person with kindness and reassurance, and make you both happier and healthier.

© King Features Syndicate


Dr-Oz
Researchers found that simply validating someone's negative emotions (sadness, confusion, anger, boredom, frustration, etc.) can boost their mood and provide the kind of calming reassurance that a hug transmits.
emotional health, cortisol, oxytocin, dr. oz
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2021-48-13
Wednesday, 13 January 2021 11:48 AM
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