Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

 

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Tags: dopamine | obesity | addiction | Dr. Oz

Food Choices Affect Future Generations

By and
Thursday, 08 November 2018 11:13 AM Current | Bio | Archive

When Joe Coleman pitched for the Philadelphia Athletics, Baltimore Orioles, and Detroit Tigers from 1942 to 1955, he could only hope his baseball talent would be passed on to the next generations of his family.

Well, it was. Son Joe Coleman pitched for 15 seasons, from 1965 to 1979, and was a two-time 20-game winner. Today, his grandson Casey Coleman is with the Cubs Triple A team in Des Moines, Iowa.

Sometimes, it's talent that's passed down. But other times, unfortunately, it's health challenges such as obesity and addiction.

A new study published in the journal Translational Psychiatry explains how choices made during pregnancy and breastfeeding affect the health of future generations.

Swiss researchers fed healthy female mice a high-fat diet during pregnancy and while nursing. The repercussions showed up in three generations of their offspring (those generations didn't eat excess fat, and neither did their mates).

They had changes in their brain's dopamine-powered reward system that predisposed them to "develop obesity and addictive-like behaviors ..."

It seems your choices today may force your next three generations to battle obesity, addiction, and the health problems associated with those conditions.

So how much and what kind of fats should you eat every day to protect your health and the health of future generations?

Stick with fats in nuts, oils like extra virgin olive oil, and animal proteins like salmon. Then, on a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet, aim for 20 to 35 percent of calories (400 to 700 calories or 33 to 78 grams) from those good-for-you fats.

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A new study published in the journal Translational Psychiatry explains how choices made during pregnancy and breastfeeding affect the health of future generations.
dopamine, obesity, addiction, Dr. Oz
254
2018-13-08
Thursday, 08 November 2018 11:13 AM
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