Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

 

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: circadian rhythm | metabolism | cancer | Dr. Oz

Eating Late Increases Cancer Risk

By and
Tuesday, 14 August 2018 09:56 AM Current | Bio | Archive

In a scene from the hit TV show "Mad Men," Don Draper and Harry Crane go to White Castle for a late-night snack after a Rolling Stones concert.

Don watches in disgust as Harry downs 20 sliders and doesn't save any to bring to his family.

"Let them get their own," Harry says. "You bring home a bag of food and they go at it and there's nothing left for you. Eat first."

Harry may have thought he was looking out for himself, but he really was doing his kids a favor by preventing them from late-night eating fests, as well as tanking his own health. (He consumed about 2,800 calories and 120 grams of fat in that one sitting).

A new study from Spain published in the International Journal of Cancer looked at more than 4,000 people and found that those who ate their last meal before 9 p.m. (or at least two hours before they went to bed) had a 20 percent lower risk of breast or prostate cancer.

The researchers think that eating late boosts cancer risks because going to sleep soon after eating affects your ability to metabolize food — and that can trigger cancer-promoting inflammation.

They also suggest that it's no healthier to eat late and then push your natural bedtime later. Past research has found that disruption in circadian rhythm is also linked to a higher risk of cancer.

Research indicates that the ideal break between dinner and breakfast may be 13-plus hours.

© 2019 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Dr-Oz
A new study from Spain found that those who ate their last meal before 9 p.m. (or at least two hours before they went to bed) had a 20 percent lower risk of breast or prostate cancer.
circadian rhythm, metabolism, cancer, Dr. Oz
248
2018-56-14
Tuesday, 14 August 2018 09:56 AM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved