Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

 

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: breast cancer | heart attack | stroke | Dr. Oz

Breast Cancer Survivors Face Heart Risks

By
Monday, 12 Feb 2018 04:15 PM Current | Bio | Archive

"The Book of Broken Hearts," "The Queen of Broken Hearts," and "Broken Hearts, Fences, and Other Things to Mend" all belong to the long list of novels devoted to figuring out how girls and women can repair broken hearts.

But for women in the U.S. who have survived breast cancer (the American Cancer Society estimates that 90 percent of breast cancer patients are alive five years after their diagnosis), the challenge is to avoid a broken heart altogether. That's because the No. 1 cause of death for breast cancer survivors is heart disease.

Unfortunately, women tend to gain weight during breast cancer treatment, and afterward they often develop metabolic syndrome (elevated blood pressure, triglycerides/LDL cholesterol, and glucose, and/or excess body fat around the waist) and Type 2 diabetes.

Those factors raise their risk of death from stroke, heart failure, or heart attack, say researchers who conducted a new study that appeared in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

The smart move? Make sure that after your treatment, you get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise, plus resistance/strength training each week.

In this study of 100 women, after breast-cancer treatment only 15 percent of those who followed that exercise regimen for four months developed metabolic syndrome, but 80 percent of those in the no-exercise control group did.

So talk with your doc about starting an exercise regimen and a stress-management program, and choose healthy oils and appropriate portion sizes. These choices will raise your spirits and help save your life.

© 2018 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.

   
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Make sure that after your treatment, you get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise, plus resistance/strength training each week.
breast cancer, heart attack, stroke, Dr. Oz
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2018-15-12
Monday, 12 Feb 2018 04:15 PM
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