Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

 

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Tags: acne | inflammation | probiotics | dr. oz

Defeating Adult-Onset Acne

By and Monday, 03 August 2020 12:01 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Adult acne isn't anything to be ashamed of — just ask model Chrissy Teigen, actress and writer Mindy Kaling, or actress Bella Thorne, all of whom have shared make-up-free pictures of their skin in distress.

They are not alone. The International Dermatology Institute says studies indicate that 40% to 55% of people ages 20 to 40 have low-grade, persistent acne and oily skin.

And according to the Journal of American Academy of Dermatology, 54% of women 25 and older have some facial acne.

For many, it's a continuation of skin issues they had as a teenager, but others — especially postmenopausal women — may get adult-onset acne.

Why does this happen, and how can you get control of it?

The most common causes are excess oil production, pores clogged with "sticky" skin cells, bacteria, and inflammation.

A new study out of France that surveyed more than 24,000 people found that food may be a trigger too. The data published in JAMA Dermatology shows that milk, fatty foods, and sugary foods and beverages are serious breakout risks.

Your first smart step is an elimination diet, removing food culprits from your menu. If after a few weeks your skin clears, drop those foods permanently from your diet. (You should get rid of them anyway, because those foods also increase your risk of heart disease, obesity, some cancers, and diabetes.)

Try taking a probiotic. That may reduce breakouts as well.

And see a dermatologist to talk about light therapy and various medicines that can be effective.

               

© King Features Syndicate


   
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The International Dermatology Institute says studies indicate that 40% to 55% of people ages 20 to 40 have low-grade, persistent acne and oily skin.
acne, inflammation, probiotics, dr. oz
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2020-01-03
Monday, 03 August 2020 12:01 PM
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