Peter Hibberd, M.D., is a doctor whose advice is based on more than 28 years of hospital outpatient and inpatient experience. He is an experienced emergency medicine physician, surgeon, and consultant. Dr. Hibberd is certified by the American Board of Emergency Medicine. He is also a fellow and active member of the American Academy of Family Physicians, an active member of the American College of Emergency Physicians, and a member and fellow of the American Academy of Emergency Medicine. Dr. Hibberd has earned numerous national and international professional certifications, memberships, and awards.
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How Soon Can I Quit Taking Warfarin?

Monday, 07 Jun 2010 11:25 AM


Question: I was put on warfarin for six months for a blood clot that went to my lung from an Achilles repair surgery. The doctor told me all the foods I need to avoid, but what can I do to get my blood back to normal so I can quit taking warfarin?

Dr. Hibberd's Answer:
A minimum of six months on warfarin is advised for prevention of pulmonary embolism that occurs after a DVT (deep vein thrombosis), and depending on other factors, sometimes as long as 12 months. This is given to protect you from recurrence.

Pulmonary embolism can be rapidly fatal, as your circulation to lung is impaired by the clot and can lead to cardiac arrest. Certain foods interfere with warfarin, and foods rich in vitamin K are to be avoided. The underlying reason you developed the clot was not indicated.

Did your doctor check you for a coagulation disorder that is expected to recur once you stop taking warfarin, or do they feel that this peripheral deep vein thrombosis was an unfortunate episode and is not expected to recur? Be sure to have a visit with your doctor to clarify this. If they are not sure, studies looking for procoagulant disorders can be performed.

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Dr-Hibberd
A minimum of six months on warfarin is advised for prevention of pulmonary embolism that occurs after a DVT (deep vein thrombosis), and depending on other factors, sometimes as long as 12 months. This is given to protect you from recurrence.
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2010-25-07
Monday, 07 Jun 2010 11:25 AM
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