Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: surgery | heart attack | hospitalization | stroke

Noncardiac Surgeries Raise Risks

By
Wednesday, 07 November 2018 04:45 PM Current | Bio | Archive

People who undergo cardiovascular procedures such as coronary artery bypass surgery or even angioplasty are at a higher risk of suffering a heart attack or stroke. But one study found that other surgeries may raise the odds as well.

A research team from New York University School of Medicine looked at the risk of heart attack and stroke in procedures performed for other reasons.

The researchers analyzed data from more than 10 million hospitalizations between 2004 and 2013, looking for heart attacks, strokes, and death after surgeries that weren’t heart-related. They saw these complications in about 3 percent of cases.

The rates were highest for vascular, thoracic, and transplant surgeries (7.7 percent, 6.5 percent and 6.3 percent, respectively). Obstetric and gynecologic surgeries had the lowest risk, the authors reported in JAMA Cardiology.

Patients who had one of these complications were generally older, male, and more likely to have risk factors such as obesity, tobacco use, alcohol abuse, hypertension, diabetes, and kidney disease.

The researchers estimate that about 150,000 heart attacks and strokes occur each year in the U.S. following noncardiac surgeries.

This study indicates that doctors need to watch cardiac markers after those procedures.  

© 2018 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Dr-Crandall
People who undergo cardiovascular procedures such as coronary artery bypass surgery or even angioplasty are at a higher risk of suffering a heart attack or stroke.
surgery, heart attack, hospitalization, stroke
195
2018-45-07
Wednesday, 07 November 2018 04:45 PM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved