Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: sleep apnea | stroke | high blood pressure

Take Action to Treat Sleep Apnea

By Wednesday, 17 February 2021 04:42 PM Current | Bio | Archive

It’s estimated that 22 million Americans suffer from sleep apnea, the majority of them undiagnosed. Untreated sleep apnea can lead to a range of cardiovascular problems, including stroke, high blood pressure, and sudden cardiac death, as well as metabolic problems like obesity and diabetes.

A recent study of 4,000 bank employees in Spain, published in the journal Sleep, found that those who slept less than six hours a night were 27 percent more likely to have atherosclerosis (the disease process that causes cardiovascular diseases) throughout their body. And those with poor quality sleep were 34 percent more likely to have evidence of it than people who sleep soundly.

Obstructive sleep apnea is increasingly being identified as a contributor to heart attacks. In one high-profile example, a coroner’s report listed sleep apnea as among the contributors in the death of actress Carrie Fisher, who suffered a massive fatal heart attack in 2016.

And this danger to the heart can occur no matter what your age. A study published in the journal ERJ Open Research found that sleep apnea could even be the cause of seemingly healthy young athletes dying from a sudden and unexplained heart attack. Symptoms of sleep apnea include:

• Loud snoring

• Excessive daytime sleepiness

• Sudden awakening accompanied by shortness of breath

• Awakening with a dry mouth or sore throat

• Coughing or gagging upon awakening

• Morning headache

• Difficulty staying asleep

• Problems paying attention or focusing

Sleep apnea is often thought of as a problem that afflicts overweight middle-age men, but it can occur in anyone no matter what their body build. It also occurs in women, who tend to be overlooked. If you think you might have sleep apnea, ask your doctor for a referral to a reputable sleep clinic.

There are a variety of treatments available.

© 2021 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


   
1Like our page
2Share
Dr-Crandall
Untreated sleep apnea can lead to a range of cardiovascular problems, including stroke, high blood pressure, and sudden cardiac death, as well as metabolic problems like obesity and diabetes.
sleep apnea, stroke, high blood pressure
305
2021-42-17
Wednesday, 17 February 2021 04:42 PM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 
Newsmax TV Live

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved