Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: sleep apnea | heart | blue light | caffeine

Sleep Well to Keep Your Heart Young

By Wednesday, 24 June 2020 04:08 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Most of the major risk factors that age your heart — such as high cholesterol, obesity, and high blood pressure — are well-known. But one factor is often overlooked: too little sleep.

All of us need between eight to 10 hours a night. With less than that, your body will be under constant stress, which leads to high blood pressure and heart disease.

Unfortunately, most people say that the quantity and quality of their sleep diminishes as they get older. It doesn’t have to.

Most people have habits that work against getting a full night’s sleep. And when they change them, they find that elusive slumber they crave.

Here are some tips for better sleep:

• Get checked for obstructive sleep apnea. If you snore, it’s possible you have this common sleep disorder, which stresses the heart and is linked to high blood pressure, heart disease, and other ailments.

• Go to bed and wake up at the same time every day. Your body performs best with a predictable lifestyle.

• Wind down before bed. Stay away from computers and TV; read a book, turn the lights down, and your sleep cycle will return to normal.

• Banish your laptop and smartphone from the bedroom. The “blue light” from these devices may disrupt your body’s sleep-wake cycle.

• Avoid caffeine. Don’t drink coffee or caffeinated tea after 5 p.m.; or, if you’re sensitive to it, earlier.

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Dr-Crandall
Most of the major risk factors that age your heart — such as high cholesterol, obesity, and high blood pressure — are well-known. But one factor is often overlooked: too little sleep.
sleep apnea, heart, blue light, caffeine
234
2020-08-24
Wednesday, 24 June 2020 04:08 PM
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