Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: singing | heart | health | vagus nerve | endorphins | Dr. Chauncey Crandall

Singing's Link to Heart Health

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Wednesday, 28 Aug 2013 02:18 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Too often, people think that reversing heart disease means having no fun. That’s not true! A recent study suggested that singing, especially in a group, does your heart good.
 
Published in Frontiers in Neuroscience, the study brought together 15 high school students and had them sing different things as a group. The results show that music’s melody and structure has a direct link to the cardiac activity of choir members.

Singing in unison has a synchronizing effect, so that the heart rate of the singers tends to increase and decrease at the same time.
 
Singing regulates the vagus nerve, which is believed to control our “mind-body” connection.
Songs with long phrases achieve the same effect as breathing exercises in yoga, and help to reduce stress — a major risk factor for heart disease.
 
Although this was a small study, other previous research has found that singing strengthens the lungs. In addition, the very act of singing causes the release of endorphins, our natural, so-called “happy” hormones.
 
If that’s not enough, joining together in group singing brings people together, which helps
overcome social isolation, another cardiovascular risk factor.


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Too often, people think that reversing heart disease means having no fun. That's not true! A recent study suggested that singing, especially in a group, does your heart good. Published in Frontiers in Neuroscience, the study brought together 15 high school students and...
singing,heart,health,vagus nerve,endorphins,Dr. Chauncey Crandall
187
2013-18-28
Wednesday, 28 Aug 2013 02:18 PM
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