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Tags: nuts | blood sugar | diabetes | hemoglobin

Nuts Lower Blood Sugar

By Tuesday, 11 August 2020 04:41 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Research suggests that about one-half cup of nuts per day significantly reduced blood sugar levels, which are crucial for those with Type 2 diabetes.

Scientists from the University of Toronto and St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, Canada, found that tree nuts (almonds, Brazils, cashews, hazelnuts, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios, macadamias, and walnuts) as well as peanuts, improved blood lipid levels and blood sugar levels among 117 non-insulin-dependent adults with diabetes (with an average age of 62) who were all being treated with oral hypoglycemic medications.

The subjects ate three different diets for three months. The first group ate a supplement of 75 grams (one-half cup) of mixed nuts each day; the second diet included 38 grams (one-fourth cup) of mixed nuts and half portion of whole wheat muffins; and the third group ate a full portion of whole wheat muffins daily.

“The original findings revealed that the full-dose nut group had a significant reduction in hemoglobin A1C compared to the other two groups,” said Dr. David Jenkins of the University of Toronto and St. Michael’s Hospital. “We also found lower levels of small LDL cholesterol.” He added, “The bottom line is that this study showed a modest but significant improvement in blood glucose control — despite the higher fat intake — and improvement in lipid risk factors for heart disease with increasing nut dose.”

Patients following the diet plan could not only lower their blood sugar levels, they could also reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease, as the amount of “bad” cholesterol in their blood would be lower.

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Dr-Crandall
Research suggests that about one-half cup of nuts per day significantly reduced blood sugar levels, which are crucial for those with Type 2 diabetes.
nuts, blood sugar, diabetes, hemoglobin
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2020-41-11
Tuesday, 11 August 2020 04:41 PM
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