Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: metabolism | calories | artificial sweetener

Diet Drinks Fool Body's Metabolism

By Thursday, 12 December 2019 02:01 PM Current | Bio | Archive

When people go on a diet, they often drink artificially sweetened drinks and eat low-calorie dishes to help them meet a goal.

Unfortunately, they may be tricking their metabolism into piling on even more weight and triggering diabetes, according to a study from Yale University.

The sweetness in naturally sweetened foods tells the body the food contains energy; the sweeter the food, the more energy it usually contains.

But when a beverage is either too sweet or not sweet enough for the number of calories it contains, the body’s normal metabolic response is disrupted.

The new study shows that sweetness helps to determine how calories are metabolized and signaled to the brain.

When sweetness and calories are matched, the calories are properly metabolized, and this is registered by brain reward circuits.

However, when a “mismatch” occurs, the calories fail to trigger the body’s metabolism, and the reward circuits in the brain fail to recognize that calories have been consumed. As a result, a person could be compelled to overeat.

“In other words, the assumption that more calories trigger greater metabolic and brain response is wrong,” said senior author Dana Small, professor of psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine. “Calories are only half of the equation; sweet taste perception is the other half.”

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Dr-Crandall
The sweetness in naturally sweetened foods tells the body the food contains energy; the sweeter the food, the more energy it usually contains.
metabolism, calories, artificial sweetener
213
2019-01-12
Thursday, 12 December 2019 02:01 PM
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