Chauncey W. Crandall, M.D., F.A.C.C.

Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: heart disease | marriage | stroke | dr. crandall
OPINION

Heart Disease Can Come in Twos

Chauncey Crandall, M.D. By Wednesday, 27 March 2024 04:43 PM EDT Current | Bio | Archive

A Chinese research team surveyed more than 5,000 couples living in seven regions of China and found that people whose spouse had heart disease were more than twice as likely to develop it as well.

The association was particularly strong for men; the study found 28 percent of men whose wives had heart disease also had heart problems, compared to 12.8 percent of men whose wives didn’t have heart disease. This association was highest for men whose wives had a history of stroke and obesity, and were smokers.

Heart disease risk was 21 percent for women with spouses who had heart disease, compared to just 9 percent for those with healthy husbands. For women, heart disease was highest among those whose husbands had a history of stroke, according to the study presented at the American College of Cardiology.

It’s no mystery why couples are at higher risk of both partners developing heart disease. When you’re part of a couple, you share the same home environment. This can mean that couples influence each other when it comes to what they eat and whether they tend to live active or sedentary lifestyles.

Smoking can be another big factor. One partner who smokes may influence the other to pick up the habit. But even if they don’t, it exposes the nonsmoking partner to secondhand smoke, which can lead to cancer and/or cardiovascular disease.

© 2024 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Dr-Crandall
A Chinese research team surveyed more than 5,000 couples living in seven regions of China and found that people whose spouse had heart disease were more than twice as likely to develop it as well.
heart disease, marriage, stroke, dr. crandall
230
2024-43-27
Wednesday, 27 March 2024 04:43 PM
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