Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: heart attack | winter | atrial fibrillation

Cold Weather Endangers the Heart

By Tuesday, 27 October 2020 04:35 PM Current | Bio | Archive

The incidence of heart attacks is greater during the fall and winter seasons. In fact, studies show that snow shoveling and even the cold weather itself increase heart risks.

A few years ago, Swiss researchers reported that heart disease risk factors — including high blood pressure, cholesterol, and waist circumference — seemed to be higher than average in the winter months (particularly January and February) and lower than average in the summer months (particularly June, July, and August). Weight and blood glucose levels remained the same.

A second study found that the number of heart attacks rose as cold weather set in. They specifically found that each 50°F drop in temperature led to a 7 percent uptick in heart attacks.

The researchers also presented data to the European Society of Cardiology Congress that shows it isn’t simply more heart attacks, but more potentially fatal ones as well. They matched heart attack statistics with temperature changes in Winnipeg, Canada, and found that each 50°F drop in temperature was associated with a 7 percent increased risk of ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) — the most severe form of heart attack. The increase was even predictable with weather forecasts.

Chilly temperatures can also bring on the heartbeat irregularity called atrial fibrillation, which steeply increases the risk of ischemic stroke, the most common type. Taiwanese researchers, who looked at nearly 290,000 patients, found the highest incidence of ischemic stroke in the colder months, and the lowest in the summer months.

Scientists believe that cold weather narrows blood vessels and makes blood clot more readily. Those factors increase the risk of heart attacks and strokes.

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The incidence of heart attacks is greater during the fall and winter seasons. In fact, studies show that snow shoveling and even the cold weather itself increase heart risks.
heart attack, winter, atrial fibrillation
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2020-35-27
Tuesday, 27 October 2020 04:35 PM
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