Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: genetic testing | alzheimers | mutation | dr. crandall

Genetic Testing: What to Expect

By Monday, 21 December 2020 04:15 PM Current | Bio | Archive

There are several companies that offer DIY genetic testing, but they all use similar methods. When you purchase one of their kits, you’ll receive detailed instructions for sending a sample of DNA from your body to the lab. You’ll either be asked to spit into a tube or wipe a swab inside your mouth. Then you send off the test and you’ll receive the results via email.

With some companies, you can dictate whether or not you want to receive information on your risk for diseases for which there is currently no cure, like Alzheimer’s. If your family medical tree suggests you may have a genetic propensity for a cardiac problem, or if your DYI genetic test shows you have inherited a higher-than-average risk for an inherited disease, you should undergo professional genetic testing.

These tests are not as accurate as professional testing, and there are different mutations they may have missed.

You also have to understand what “positive” and “negative” mean in the context of genetic testing. A positive result means there’s a reasonable certainty a health condition was caused by a genetic mutation. But if the result is negative, it doesn’t completely rule out the possibility the disease was inherited. It may be that a specific genetic link has not yet been identified.

And remember that getting your genetic testing results via email is no substitute for speaking one-on-one with a certified genetics counselor, who can provide you with the type of information you need so that you and your doctor can create a treatment and monitoring plan.

Over time, new information may come to light, so it’s important to stay in contact with the healthcare provider who performed the genetic test.

DIY genetic services update their databases as well, so it’s important to keep an eye out for changes.

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Dr-Crandall
There are several companies that offer DIY genetic testing, but they all use similar methods. When you purchase one of their kits, you’ll receive detailed instructions for sending a sample of DNA from your body to the lab.
genetic testing, alzheimers, mutation, dr. crandall
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2020-15-21
Monday, 21 December 2020 04:15 PM
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