Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: fatty liver | Mediterranean diet | obesity

How to Beat Fatty Liver Disease

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Tuesday, 30 April 2019 02:54 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Although there are drugs in the pipeline, there is currently no medication to combat nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

However, you can actually manage the condition — and even reverse it — in the same way you do heart disease.

Lose Weight. A study of 50 patients found that those who lost 5 percent of their weight improved their blood glucose levels and reduced the fat in their livers. Those who lost 9 percent of their body weight actually began to see liver damage reverse.

Eat Better. Whether you’re losing weight or not, it’s important to improve your diet. Replace processed and fried foods with whole foods such as fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and fish or meat that is not fried. Some studies show that the Mediterranean diet, with its reliance on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and olive oil may also protect the liver. You should also eliminate refined sugars from your diet

Exercise. A study of obese people with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease found that walking one hour a day on a treadmill for seven consecutive days jump-started metabolism and helped reduce inflammatory damage.

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Although there are drugs in the pipeline, there is currently no medication to combat nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.
fatty liver, Mediterranean diet, obesity
183
2019-54-30
Tuesday, 30 April 2019 02:54 PM
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